Pop Art

Pop Art was born in Britain in the mid 1950s. It was the brain-child of several young subversive artists – as most modern art tends to be. The first application of the term Pop Art occurred during discussions among artists who called themselves the Independent Group (IG), which was part of the Institute of Contemporary Art in London, begun around 1952-53.

Pop Art appreciates popular culture, or what we also call “material culture.” It does not critique the consequences of materialism and consumerism; it simply recognizes its pervasive presence as a natural fact.

Acquiring consumer goods, responding to clever advertisements and building more effective forms of mass communication (back then: movies, television, newspapers and magazines) galvanized energy among young people born during the Post-World War II generation. Rebelling against the esoteric vocabulary of abstract art, they wanted to express their optimism after so much hardship and privation in a youthful visual language. Pop Art celebrated the United Generation of Shopping.

How Long Was the Movement?

The movement was officially christened by Lawrence Alloway in his article “The Arts and Mass Media,” Architectural Record (February 1958). Art history text books tend to claim that Richard Hamilton’s Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Home So Different and So Appealing? (1956) signaled that Pop Art had arrived on the scene. The collage appeared in This Is Tomorrow at Whitechapel Art Gallery in 1956, so we might say that this work of art and this exhibition mark the official beginning of the movement, even though the artists worked on Pop Art themes earlier in their careers…

More info can be viewed at https://www.thoughtco.com/pop-art-art-history-183310

Showing all 12 results

error: Content is protected !!